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Notice Board

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT WISHES YOU ALL A VERY HAPPY INDEPENDENCE DAY

Friday, November 4, 2016

AUTO FUELS & LUBRICATION (UNIT IV) By Asst. Prof CP SAINI


















AUTOMOTIVE FUEL AND LUBRICATION UNIT I& III-(BY-Asst. Prof. C.P. SINGH)



UNIT III
















Mechanics of solids by R.K RAJPUT

Mechanics-of-solids BY R-K-RAJPUT-S-CHAND


 Unit-I Introduction: Force, types of forces, Characteristics of a force, System of forces, Composition and resolution of forces, forces in equilibrium, principle and laws of equilibrium, Free body diagrams, Lami's Theorem, equations of equilibrium, Concept of center of gravity and centroid, centroid of various shapes: Triangle, circle, semicircle and trapezium, theorem of parallel and perpendicular axes, moment of inertia of simple geometrical figures, polar moment of inertia. Numerical Problems

Simple stresses &strains : Concept & types of Stresses and strains, Polson’s ratio, stresses and strain in simple and compound bars under axial loading, stress strain diagrams, Hooks law, elastic constants & their relationships, temperature stress & strain in simple & compound bars under axial loading, Numerical problems.

 Unit-II Principle stresses: Two dimensional systems, stress at a point on a plane, principal stresses and principal planes, Mohr’s circle of stresses,

 Numerical Shear Force & Bending Moments : Definitions, SF & BM diagrams for cantilevers, simply supported beams with or without over-hang and calculation of maximum BM & SF and the point of contraflexture under (i) concentrated loads, (ii) uniformly distributed loads over whole span or a part of it, (iii)combination of concentrated loads and uniformly distributed loads, (iv) uniformly varying loads and (v) application of moments, relation between the rate of loading, the shear force and the bending moments, Numerical Problems. . 8 8





Unit-III Torsion of circular Members: Derivation of equation of torsion, Solid and hollow circular shafts, tapered shaft, stepped shaft & composite circular shafts, Numerical problems.

 Flexural and shear stresses – Theory of simple bending, Assumptions, derivation of equation of bending, neutral axis, determination of bending stresses, section modulus of rectangular & circular (solid & hollow), I,T, Angle, channel sections, composite beams, shear stresses in beams with derivation, shear stress distribution across various beam sections like rectangular, circular, triangular, I, T, angle sections. Combined bending and torsion, equivalent torque,. Numerical problems.



Unit-IV Columns & Struts: Column under axial load, concept of instability and buckling, slenderness ratio, derivation of Euler's formula for crippling load for columns of different ends, concept of equivalent length, eccentric loading, Rankine formulae and other empirical relations, Numerical problems.

Slope &Deflection : Relationship between bending moment, slope & deflection, moment area method, method of integration, Macaulay’s method, calculations for slope and deflection of (i) cantilevers and (ii) simply supported beams with or without overhang under concentrated load, Uniformly distributed loads or combination of concentrated and uniformly distributed loads, Numerical problems.













Mechanics of solid Notes


Stress and Strain: Basic Terms and Concepts

Stress Terms

Stress is defined as force per unit area. It has the same units as pressure, and in fact pressure is one special variety of stress. However, stress is a much more complex quantity than pressure because it varies both with direction and with the surface it acts on.
Compression
Stress that acts to shorten an object.
Tension
Stress that acts to lengthen an object.
Normal Stress
Stress that acts perpendicular to a surface. Can be either compressional or tensional.
Shear
Stress that acts parallel to a surface. It can cause one object to slide over another. It also tends to deform originally rectangular objects into parallelograms. The most general definition is that shear acts to change the angles in an object.
Hydrostatic
Stress (usually compressional) that is uniform in all directions. A scuba diver experiences hydrostatic stress. Stress in the earth is nearly hydrostatic. The term for uniform stress in the earth is lithostatic.
Directed Stress
Stress that varies with direction. Stress under a stone slab is directed; there is a force in one direction but no counteracting forces perpendicular to it. This is why a person under a thick slab gets squashed but a scuba diver under the same pressure doesn't. The scuba diver feels the same force in all directions.
In geology we never see stress. We only see the results of stress as it deforms materials. Even if we were to use a strain gauge to measure in-situ stress in the rocks, we would not measure the stress itself. We would measure the deformation of the strain gauge (that's why it's called a "strain gauge") and use that to infer the stress.

Strain Terms

Strain is defined as the amount of deformation an object experiences compared to its original size and shape. For example, if a block 10 cm on a side is deformed so that it becomes 9 cm long, the strain is (10-9)/10 or 0.1 (sometimes expressed in percent, in this case 10 percent.) Note that strain is dimensionless.
Longitudinal or Linear Strain
Strain that changes the length of a line without changing its direction. Can be either compressional or tensional.
Compression
Longitudinal strain that shortens an object.
Tension
Longitudinal strain that lengthens an object.
Shear
Strain that changes the angles of an object. Shear causes lines to rotate.
Infinitesimal Strain
Strain that is tiny, a few percent or less. Allows a number of useful mathematical simplifications and approximations.
Finite Strain
Strain larger than a few percent. Requires a more complicated mathematical treatment than infinitesimal strain.
Homogeneous Strain
Uniform strain. Straight lines in the original object remain straight. Parallel lines remain parallel. Circles deform to ellipses. Note that this definition rules out folding, since an originally straight layer has to remain straight.
Inhomogeneous Strain
How real geology behaves. Deformation varies from place to place. Lines may bend and do not necessarily remain parallel.

Terms for Behavior of Materials

Elastic
Material deforms under stress but returns to its original size and shape when the stress is released. There is no permanent deformation. Some elastic strain, like in a rubber band, can be large, but in rocks it is usually small enough to be considered infinitesimal.
Brittle
Material deforms by fracturing. Glass is brittle. Rocks are typically brittle at low temperatures and pressures.
Ductile
Material deforms without breaking. Metals are ductile. Many materials show both types of behavior. They may deform in a ductile manner if deformed slowly, but fracture if deformed too quickly or too much. Rocks are typically ductile at high temperatures or pressures.
Viscous
Materials that deform steadily under stress. Purely viscous materials like liquids deform under even the smallest stress. Rocks may behave like viscous materials under high temperature and pressure.
Plastic
Material does not flow until a threshhold stress has been exceeded.
Viscoelastic
Combines elastic and viscous behavior. Models of glacio-isostasy frequently assume a viscoelastic earth: the crust flexes elastically and the underlying mantle flows viscously.


































































































































































































































































































































































Steam Turbines (SGP)

Nozzle (SGP)

Rankine Cycle (SGP)

HEAT AND MASS TRANSFER NOTES LINK-(by Asst Prof. CP SAINI)

----HERE ARE THE DIRECT LINKS TO THE SELECTED TOPICS---

 HEAT AND MASS TRANSFER BY RK RAJPUT
1. CONDUCTION
   1.1 BASICS
   1.2 ONE DIMENSIONAL STEADY STATE HEAT CONDUCTION
   1.3 EXTENDED SURFACE HEAT TRANSFER
   1.4 UNSTEADY STATE HEAT CONDUCTION

2. CONVECTION (BASICS)

3. RADIATION

4. HEAT EXCHANGERS

Heat Transfer, Unit IV (By Asst. Prof. C.P. SAINI)

UNIT-IV (HEAT EXCHANGERS)

LOG MEAN TEMPERATURE DIFFERENCE(LMTD)

































Heat Transfer Unit-1(By: Asst Prof. C.P. SAINI)

UNIT-1 (BASICS)

Solids,  on the  other hand,  have  atoms/molecules which are more  closely packed which cannot  move as freely as  in gases. Hence, they cannot  effectively transfer energy through these  same mechanisms.  Instead, solids may exhibit energy through vibration or rotation of the nucleus. Hence,  the energy transfer is typically through lattice vibrations.  Another important mechanism in which materials maintain energy is by shifting electrons into higher orbital rings.  In the case  of electrical conductors  the  electrons  are  weakly bonded to the  molecule  and can  drift  from one  molecule  to another,  transporting their energy in the process.  Hence, flow  of electrons, which is commonly observed in metals,  is an effective  transport  mechanism,  resulting in a  correlation that  materials which are  excellent  electrical  conductors  are  usually excellent thermal conductors.